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Letter, from Catherine Dickens to Daniel Maclise, 22 March 1842

Collection

Archives & Manuscripts

Object number (per part)

B68

Object name (per part)

Letter

Production person

Catherine Dickens

Production date

22 March 1842

Label

Catherine Dickens's letter to Maclise forming page 3 of Charles Dickens letter to Maclise (A617) written during their first trip to the US in 1842 and mentioning Maclise's portrait of the children which he painted for her to take with her.

Physical description

2 pp in 4. A single sheet of white laid paper folded in half to create four pages, and is written on all four pages in brown/black ink. Charles Dickens has written his portion of the letter on the first two pages, Catherine has written on the third page, while the fourth page was folded to the outside with the address. There is a red coloured circle remaining from the wax seal.

Object history note

This letter from Catherine Dickens to Daniel Maclise forms the last section of the letter Charles Dickens wrote to him from Baltimore during the couple's extended visit to the US in 1842. Catherine mentions Marion Ely (the niece of Mrs Talfourd) who for a time, Maclise was very interested in. Nathaniel Parker Willis was a poet and journalist for the New York Mirror, who also sympathised with Dickens's stand on copyright.

Inscription content

Dear Mr Maclise

I only add a word to put you in mind there is such a being in existence which I fear you have forgotten unless that heavenly portrait has awakened some dormant recollections. Pray write to us, you do not know what a delight it is to receive letters from our friends in this distant [land]. Does Marion still reign paramou[nt] in your heart or has some [other] bright being taken her place? It is just dinner time so [I] only add that I am alway[s]

Your very sincere frie[nd]

Catherine Dickens

My beautiful sketch of our dar[lings] is more admired than I can possibly describe. It is in great demand wherever we go and Willis the author actually asked me to give it to him imagine Such impudence! and audacity!
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